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Plinth - Collected Machine Music album download

Plinth - Collected Machine Music album download Performer: Plinth
Album: Collected Machine Music
Country: US
Released: 2012
Style: Experimental
Size MP3: 1611 mb.
Size FLAC: 1265 mb.
Rating: 4.4/5
Votes: 351
Other Formats: AHX DMF AAC MMF AC3 AA APE



To these ears, Collected Machine Music is the best music box album ever made. Eight of the tracks first appeared six years ago as Victorian Machine Music 1-8, but the CD3″ swiftly sold out. These tracks now have new titles and appear on Collected Machine Music as tracks 2, 7, 3, 5, 14, 9, 11 and 13. The other seven selections are new, and mix perfectly with their predecessors. This sort of music is timeless: a reclaimed relic that travels across the centuries with nary a dent  . Collected Machine Music is the latest in a long line of pleasingly diverse recordings from Michael Tanner. Hats off to Tanner and to Time Released Sound for a remarkable accomplishment.

Listen to music from Plinth like Bracken, I & more. Find the latest tracks, albums, and images from Plinth. 1) Plinth is the alias of Dorset based instrumentalist, sound engineer and composer Michael Tanner. Plinth first released "Bracken" on the Geographic compilation "You Don't Need Darkness To Do What You Think Is Right" in 2001 and founded the Dorset Paeans record label a year later.

NEWS - My 2006/2012 album of music made from reconstituted Victorian music boxes and machinery is being reissued as a very limited exclusive for Norman Records in-house label Public House Recordings. 250 lovingly packaged copies and they're gawn. Did you grab one of the limited reissues of Collected Machine Music? Hope so, Norman's reported last week that there was only 15 left (I should've probably posted this then, sorry). I'm finishing one last solo album for Dark Companion records and then that's yer lot. I'm also playing my final show in Italy next month, with the legend that is Lino Capra Vaccina. More on that as and when. Collected Machine Music, by Plinth.

2. The Woman And Piece Of Furniture. Значек "play" перед названием песни дает возможность найти mp3 и прослушать любую песню с альбома Collected Machine Music Plinth.

Victorian Machine Music. The Rest, I Leave to the Poor. Plinth, Textile Ranch. Music for Smalls Lighthouse + Flotsam. Collected Machine Music.

Jo. New Music Releases. Jo. BRIAN MAY Teams Up With FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH, BRANTLEY GILBERT & KENNY WAYNE SHEPHERD For ‘Blue On Black’ – According to Kristin. According to Kristin. Dark Phoenix (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) - Hans Zimmer.

An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a collection on compact disc (CD), vinyl, audio tape, or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century as individual 78-rpm records collected in a bound book resembling a photograph album; this format evolved after 1948 into single vinyl LP records played at 33 1⁄3 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though album sales in the 21st-century have mostly focused on CD and MP3 formats.

Tracklist

Madame Pockney's Vacation
The Woman And Piece Of Furniture
14 Bathwick Hill
Lulworth Callope
Kay Harker
The London Necropolis Company
Regina-Rattle
Eight Tooth Movement
Winter Box
Episode Nine
The Musgrave Ritual
Pinned Butterflies
Cross Helical Gear
Memory Box
The Sunken Carillon

Versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
TRS011 Plinth Collected Machine Music ‎(CD, Album, Ltd) Time Released Sound TRS011 US 2012
TRS011 Plinth Collected Machine Music ‎(CD, Album, Ltd, Dig) Time Released Sound TRS011 US 2012
The Square And Compass 13 Plinth Collected Machine Music ‎(LP, Album) Public House Recordings The Square And Compass 13 UK 2017


"The philosopher, social critic and journalist Walter Benjamin once suggested that the assorted detritus of the 19th Century bourgeoisie – the knick-knacks, toys, trinkets, mechanical amusements, photographs - could, when “blasted” out of their original historical context as kitsch distractions by means of critical analysis, reveal something significant about both their own age and also that of the present. This notion developed into The Arcades Project, an extensive, wide-ranging exploration of bourgeois social history centred around the Parisian arcades.Social history and its political implications may not have been foremost in the mind of Michael Tanner, here releasing under the name Plinth, when he decided to make a collection of pieces using old Victorian music boxes, calliopes, wheezing mechanisms, and other antiquated contraptions. However, there nonetheless remains a sense in which the twinkling, huffing and whirring of these mechanical instruments is “blasted” out of historical dust and takes on new meaning. It is clear from the outset that the album is no mere stroll through the sepia streets of misty-eyed nostalgia, but instead sets out to investigate what can be created with these instruments now, using the techniques that modern composition and recording technology has made available.For Tanner, this means looping the sounds, combining them across different musical keys, varying the speed at which the music box handles are rotated, and applying subtle effects such as reverb and volume mixing. The results sound both old and new at the same time - familiar without being clichéd, inventive without breaking the spell cast by the instruments’ historicity. To coax something fresh and imaginative from these instruments without turning them into dead museum exhibits is no mean feat, but Tanner manages to surprise and delight across the album’s fifteen tracks.However, the album’s crowning glory (and perhaps what lifts it into the realm of the truly uncanny) is the packaging. The limited edition “deluxe version” comes tied to a heavy duty, hinge-lidded chocolate box, hand-worked inside and out with “150 year old English engravings, original Victorian calling cards, clock hands, brass nuts and bolts, hand printed insert and other ephemera”. Each box comes with a miniature music box and a unique song strip composed on a harp and then hand punched by Tanner. While the digipak CD comes in a run of 200, the deluxe version is limited to just 70. Time Released Sound are well-known for their extensive and beautifully handcrafted packaging, but they have really outdone themselves this time! Thankfully, Tanner’s music is certainly worthy of the fuss - a must-listen for any fan of beautiful experimental music, regardless of their feelings towards the quaint and bizarre world of Victorian mechanical memorabilia."- Nathan Thomas for Fluid Radio
"Imagine coming home tired from a long day’s work and discovering that someone had written a song for you. After such a gift, the turmoil of the day melts away. I paid nearly a day’s salary for the limited edition of Collected Machine Music, but it was well worth it. (For those who are wondering, I did not spend the week’s salary necessary to procure the tuning fork edition of Björk’s Biophilia.) The limited edition is a uniquely designed chocolate box, wrapped in a bow, with a CD attached. Inside the chocolate box: a music box and a punch strip. (Someone has eaten the chocolates!) The strip plays a beautiful little Plinth song, written just for the recipient; each strip is unique to its owner. A blank strip, hole punch and instructions for creating one’s own music box melody are also enclosed. This box will have a special place in my collection, alongside the music box that accompanied Rhian Sheehan’s Standing in Silence, the waterlogged journal of Plinth’s Music for Smalls Lighthouse, and all the other limited editions from Time Released Sound.For those on a limited budget, the disc is also available separately, and the music has its own incredible appeal. To these ears, Collected Machine Music is the best music box album ever made. Eight of the tracks first appeared six years ago as Victorian Machine Music 1-8, but the CD3″ swiftly sold out. These tracks now have new titles and appear on Collected Machine Music as tracks 2, 7, 3, 5, 14, 9, 11 and 13. The other seven selections are new, and mix perfectly with their predecessors.This sort of music is timeless: a reclaimed relic that travels across the centuries with nary a dent. But Plinth (Michael Tanner, reviewed previously at A Closer Listen under his Cloisters guise) is not trying to fool the ear. His compositions sound simultaneously contemporary and historical. As the liner notes declare, “All music within is sourced and reconstructed from the creaking, winding, piping, chiming and wood-knocking of several Victorian parlour music machines, wax cylinder recordings, a French carillon and a seafront calliope”. While the melodies could have been recorded a hundred years ago, their scratched patina marks them as memories of events that never occurred. The whistle that introduces the album could have come from a British soldier making his way across a centuries-old battlefield; the wind of the same piece could have been recorded in the early days of phonography. But neither is true. Throughout the album, the sounds of static and pre-recorded speech provide a layer of detritus that enhances, rather than abrades the melodies within. The entire album sounds like a transmission played after hours on a four-foot-wide cedar radio.Crickets and clocks, buoys and bells abound, never more so than on the album’s standout cut, “14 Bathwick Hill”. Hints of music box melodies filter through by association: “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”, “Away in a Manger”. Such connections occur because the average person encounters music box sounds primarily through snow globes. But these songs are much more complex: multi-melodic, seldom following a single thread. Tanner is playing with texture more than scale, which means that there’s little material here to inspire an earworm. If anything, it is the added effects that provoke familiarity on repeated listens: the waves and amusement park sounds of “Lullworth Calliope”, the crackly question of “The Musgrave Ritual” . (My friends, what would you do if you were sure you were going to die tomorrow?) Such enhancements provide variety and depth as well as context.Collected Machine Music is the latest in a long line of pleasingly diverse recordings from Michael Tanner. The packaging is stunning, but the music is the reason to buy this release. Hats off to Tanner and to Time Released Sound for a remarkable accomplishment." (Richard Allen) acloserlisten.com